MS Outlook 97 and 98 Interoperability with: MS Exchange Client, MS Mail 3.x, MS Schedule+ 95, MS Schedule+ 1.0

 

MS Outlook 97 and 98 White Paper

Published December 1997

 

Overview

 

If your organization is planning or considering an upgrade to Microsoft Outlook 97 or 98, you probably have some questions about how to ensure a seamless transition. You need to know how things will work differently on the client side, and how the Outlook messaging and collaboration client will interoperate with other workgroup clients in your organization. And you want to be sure you know what’s involved from the administration standpoint to keep things running smoothly during and after the migration.

This paper gives you the answers in one place to help you evaluate and manage your organization’s move to Outlook. It focuses on interoperability across Microsoft e-mail and group scheduling applications, and on coexistence issues that can affect users, administrators, and application and forms developers.

 

IMPORTANT NOTES:

1.     This paper covers both Outlook 97 and 98. There are very few differences in these versions relating to interoperability with other Microsoft clients.  Version-specific interoperability issues will be clearly noted with use of 97 or 98.  If no version year is noted, then the interoperability applies to both versions.

2.     Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 shipped with Outlook 97 clients for 16 bit Windows and Macintosh. The features of these Exchange 5.5 clients are very similar to the Microsoft Exchange clients shipped with Exchange server 5.0 and earlier. Throughout the remainder of this document, information about interoperability of Outlook with the Microsoft Exchange Client also applies to Outlook Win32’s interoperability with Outlook 97 for 16 bit Windows and Macintosh unless specifically noted otherwise.

This paper documents:

       What migrating to Outlook means for users—What works differently from their previous Microsoft messaging and group scheduling clients and how they can exchange information with users who remain on those clients.

       What system administrators need to know as they migrate users to Outlook—How to ensure a smooth migration, and how to support a mixed environment that includes combinations of Outlook, Microsoft Exchange Client, Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows, Microsoft Schedule+ 95, and Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0.

       What application and forms designers should know about building solutions for Outlook—How to create forms that work in mixed environments, and how Outlook’s enhanced application design environment, OLE Automation support, and printing tools in Outlook can help them build quality solutions for Outlook.

Although Outlook is compatible with all e-mail systems that support the Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI), this paper focuses on the interoperability between Outlook and Microsoft’s other messaging and calendar products. It does not provide comprehensive information about using, administering, or programming for Outlook; for complete, detailed information about these topics, see Outlook documentation, Microsoft Office Resource Kit or the Outlook 97 Adminstrator’s Guide. The Office Resource Kit includes Upgrading to Microsoft Outlook, which provides detailed instructions for upgrading to Outlook and importing data from your previous messaging and calendar products.  The Outlook Administrator Guide compiles Outlook 97 information from a number of published Microsoft materials (including Knowledgebase articles).  This is a one-stop resource to help accounts deploy, support, and understand Microsoft Outlook 97 in their organizations.  You can find this guide at http://www.microsoft.com/outlook/adminguide/, or ask your local sales representative. 

In addition to the Outlook product documentation and the Resource Kits, the following documents can help you plan and manage a smooth upgrade to Outlook:

       Microsoft Messaging Client Family backgrounders

       Outlook Product Enhancements Guide (for 97 or 98)

       Outlook Features and Configuration Guide

       Outlook, the Internet and Intranets

       Building Outlook Information Sharing Solutions

You can find these documents on the Outlook Website (http://www.microsoft.com/outlook) or ask your local Microsoft sales representative. 

Outlook, like Microsoft Exchange Client, can use either Microsoft Exchange Server or Microsoft Mail 3.x as its messaging transport.  In addition, Outlook 98 can use Internet messaging protocols as POP3/SMTP or IMAP4.  Outlook is available on the following platforms:  Win32, Win 3.11, and Macintosh.  (The Win 3.11 and Macintosh versions are only available with Microsoft Exchange Server.) Customers can also continue to use Microsoft Exchange client and Schedule+ for their Windows 3.11, Apple Macintosh, and MS-DOS users.  A high level of interoperability enables users of different Microsoft messaging and collaboration clients on different platforms to send and receive mail, as well as perform group scheduling duties.

In this type of mixed-client environment, users who continue to use previous Microsoft messaging and group scheduling clients cannot take full advantage of Outlook’s enhanced user interface and capabilities. These interoperability differences are similar to the differences users notice when they upgrade other applications (such as upgrading from Microsoft Word version 6.0 to Word 95). For example, because non-Outlook users cannot take advantage of many Outlook feature enhancements, they may not be able to access or view an Outlook user’s messages or other Outlook information the same way that another Outlook user can. In this paper, you’ll find out what these interoperability differences are and how you can develop an effective strategy for migrating to or coexisting with Outlook.

For organizations that are managing Outlook 97 and 98 environments, there are very few significant interoperability issues between these two versions.  Because the versions are built with the same file format, there is complete interoperability with group scheduling (send/receive meeting requests, viewing free/busy times or details, and delegate access.)  Outlook 97 and 98 users will also be able to send/receive mail across versions.  The only significant interoperability issues are new Outlook 98 features such as HTML mail, Stationery, vCard, vCalendar, and iCalendar  -- which are not supported in Outlook 97 (with exception to vCard, which is available as a free add-on to Outlook 97). 

 

How to Use This White Paper

 

This white paper consists of four main parts:

       Messaging and Collaboration—Describes how Outlook interoperates with Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows. It gives users, administrators, and forms designers the information they need to ensure a smooth transition from these messaging clients to Outlook.

       Calendaring and Scheduling—Describes how Outlook interoperates with Microsoft Schedule+ 95 and Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0. It gives users, administrators, and application designers the information they need to ensure a smooth transition from these group scheduling clients to Outlook.

       Appendix A: Interoperability Summaries by Client—Contains tables that provide an overview of Outlook’s interoperability with each client discussed in this paper: Microsoft Exchange Client, Microsoft Mail 3.x, Microsoft Schedule+ 95, and Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0.

       Appendix B: Terms Used in This White Paper—Provides definitions for the key messaging and group scheduling terms discussed in this paper. If you are unsure of the exact meaning of a term that appears in this paper, check its definition in this appendix.

The “Messaging and Collaboration” and “Calendaring and Scheduling” parts of this white paper each conclude with an interoperability table that summarizes how the clients interoperate in Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail, or mixed server environments. It is a good idea to review these interoperability tables because they may indicate additional server-specific functionality differences that are not discussed in detail within the text.

This paper can also help you hone your strategy for planning and managing your organization’s migration to Outlook. You can also use this information to help your users prepare for and take advantage of Outlook’s advanced user interface and features.

 

Messaging and Collaboration

 

Important Note   Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 shipped with Outlook 97 clients for 16 bit Windows and Macintosh. The features of these Exchange 5.5 clients are very similar to the Microsoft Exchange clients shipped with Exchange server 5.0 and earlier. Throughout the remainder of this document, information about interoperability of Outlook with the Microsoft Exchange Client also applies to Outlook Win32’s interoperability with Outlook 97 for 16 bit Windows and Macintosh unless specifically noted otherwise.

Outlook gives Microsoft Exchange Client users and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows users all the features they currently enjoy, in addition to many new information management capabilities. For example, new features Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x users get when they upgrade to Outlook include:

       Integrated calendar functions, along with contact, journal, and task features

       Rich, multiple views of messages

       Information organization, management and viewing enhancements

       Advanced printing options

Except for its new features and enhanced user interface, users can think of Outlook as a straightforward upgrade for Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows. Users can do everything they did with Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows, plus more.

In an environment in which Outlook users must share information with Microsoft Exchange Client users and/or Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows users, all users can exchange e-mail with each other. However, because many Outlook capabilities go beyond those of Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows, Outlook users should be aware that their coworkers who are still using these other clients may not be able to view or use portions of the Outlook users’ messaging information the same way other Outlook users can.

This section provides important administration and upgrade notes, and describes Outlook, Microsoft Exchange Client, and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows interoperability issues in more detail.

 

Managing a Mixed Messaging and Collaboration Environment

 

Microsoft Outlook has ease of use and interoperability with other Microsoft messaging and collaboration products and back-ends that take the administration hassle out of upgrading completely or managing mixed clients. For example, Outlook uses Microsoft Exchange Server user accounts, so administrators do not need to create or import user accounts from Microsoft Exchange Server to Outlook. In fact, for the purposes of setup and administration, administrators can think of Outlook and the Microsoft Exchange Client as the same—any user who already has an account on Microsoft Exchange automatically has an account for Outlook.

Both Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client use MAPI profiles, providers, and personal message stores, so you do not need to recreate MAPI profiles or import messages when your users upgrade from Microsoft Exchange Client to Outlook. In fact, Outlook requires no special setup or administration at all—you can simply replace Microsoft Exchange Client with Outlook. Outlook even uses the same enterprise address book as Microsoft Exchange Client.

Although Outlook works with Microsoft Mail postoffices, the full set of Outlook features is available only when using Outlook with Microsoft Exchange Server. The following Outlook features require Microsoft Exchange Server and are not available when running Outlook on Microsoft Mail 3.x postoffices:

       Opening another user’s e-mail folders as a delegate

       Security on “Sent on behalf of” messages

       Deferred delivery and message expiration

       Digital signatures and encryption

       Public folders

       Full-text search

In addition, Microsoft Mail 3.x and Outlook cannot share the same message store. To use data from a Microsoft Mail 3.x message store with Outlook, you must import the message store to an Outlook-compatible (MAPI) format. Microsoft Exchange Server includes a utility that imports Microsoft Mail message stores to MAPI format.

There are no significant interoperability issues between Outlook 97 and 98 users, except that new features in 98 (such as HTML mail, Stationery, vCard, vCalendar, and iCalendar) are not supported in Outlook 97. 

 

Upgrading and Importing Messaging Data to Outlook

 

Outlook makes it as easy and seamless as possible to upgrade from Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x. For example, Outlook uses the same configuration information as Microsoft Exchange Client, and it can use all Microsoft Exchange Client custom forms and public folders, as well as virtually all Microsoft Exchange Client extensions. Outlook can also use a Microsoft Mail 3.x user’s existing msmail.ini file and other Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows configuration information, as well as existing Microsoft Mail 3.x extensions.

This tight integration makes it easy to upgrade to Outlook from Microsoft Exchange Client or the Microsoft Mail 3.x client. Users simply install Outlook and run a separate utility to import their Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x message stores to Outlook automatically. Although Outlook does not remove Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x from users’ computers automatically, Outlook Setup gives users the option to remove these applications, as well as any unnecessary Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x files. For detailed upgrading instructions, see the Outlook product documentation.

Note   Office Setup includes the Microsoft Mail information service that enables Outlook to use a Microsoft Mail 3.x post office. This service is not installed by default, however, so users must choose to install it.

There is a seamless upgrade from Outlook 97 to 98 via the Outlook Setup Wizard which will automatically detect appropriate installation options, and imports existing accounts, profile information, folders and personal address books.

 

Basic E-mail and Collaboration Capabilities

 

Many organizations planning to migrate to Outlook want to ensure their users can perform basic e-mail and collaboration duties without interruption. The following section describes how Outlook, Microsoft Exchange Client, and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows interoperate when users exchange messages and use public folders.

 

Exchanging Messages

 

Outlook users, Microsoft Exchange Client users, and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows users can exchange e-mail messages with each other freely.

However, Outlook users in a mixed environment should be aware that their coworkers who use Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x cannot take full advantage of many Outlook features, including the following:

       Enhanced standard message form—Microsoft Exchange Client users who view messages created in Outlook see the messages in the Microsoft Exchange Client standard message form, which does not support the advanced features of the Outlook standard message form, such as message expiration and other features summarized in the following table. Similarly, Microsoft Mail 3.x users who view messages created in Outlook see the messages in the Microsoft Mail 3.x standard message form, which also does not support the advanced features of the Outlook standard message form. As a result, some of the information in the Outlook message may not be viewable to Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x users.

       Extended message properties—When a Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x user opens an Outlook message, extended Outlook message properties — such as voting buttons — that are not recognized by Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x are ignored. This means that some messages created in Outlook may appear different to Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x users. Outlook recognizes all Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x message properties, however. The following table describes how Outlook message properties interoperate with Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x.

This Outlook message property

Interoperates with Microsoft Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh, Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x client this way

Voting buttons

   Microsoft Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh users can receive and respond to voting messages using voting buttons displayed in the form, but can’t send voting messages.

   Microsoft Exchange Client and Mail 3.x users can’t send voting messages and voting messages they receive from Outlook users don’t display voting buttons.

Have reply sent to

   When a Microsoft Exchange Client user replies to an Outlook message that has this property set, the reply goes to the correct recipient automatically.

   Although Microsoft Exchange Client users cannot view this property in the Outlook messages they receive, they can view the intended recipients’ names in the To lines of their replies.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x users cannot view this property setting on Outlook messages they receive.  This feature does not work with Microsoft Mail 3.x users.

Do not deliver before

   Microsoft  Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x users cannot view this property setting on Outlook messages they receive.

   Microsoft Exchange Client users can send mail with this property set, but the property is not as accessible as it is in the Outlook user interface. Microsoft Mail 3.x users can’t set this property.

Follow Up Flag Properties (Message Flags, such as Due Date)

   Microsoft Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh users can flag messages for follow up and send messages with Follow Up Flags.

   Microsoft Exchange Client and Mail 3.x users do not receive Follow Up Flag properties in messages they receive from Outlook users.

Expires

   Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x users do not receive message expiration properties in messages they receive from Outlook users.

Microsoft Exchange Client users can send mail with this property set, but the property is not as accessible as it is in the Outlook Win 32 user interface. Ma

Read receipt

   When Outlook users send messages with the Read Receipt property to Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x recipients, the Outlook users receive the Read receipt notifications. This is the same result as when Outlook users send messages with the Read Receipt property to other Outlook users.

Delivery receipt

   When Outlook users send messages with the Delivery Receipt property to Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x recipients, the Outlook users receive the Delivery receipt notifications. This is the same result as when Outlook users send messages with the Delivery Receipt property to other Outlook users.

 

       Private items—When an Outlook Win32 user marks an item (such as an e-mail or calendar item) as Private, other Outlook users cannot view the item. However, users running Microsoft Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh, or Exchange Client can view the item if they have been granted folder access privileges for the folder in which that item is stored. Because Outlook folder-level privacy is absolute, the Outlook workaround for this functionality difference is to have Outlook Win32 users put items that they want to keep private in a separate folder that they don’t share or on which they have set restrictions.

       Non-table views—Microsoft Exchange Client users can display Outlook “table” views—views that consist only of rows and columns—if the Convert To Exchange Views check box is selected in Folder Properties for the Outlook folder. However, Microsoft Exchange Client cannot display Outlook non-table views, such as the day, week, and month views in the calendar, as well as the card, icon, and timeline views. When Outlook users and Microsoft Exchange Client users access the same set of public folders, Microsoft Exchange Client users cannot display any non-table views created by Outlook users.

       Saved views—Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client use different formats to create saved views. Outlook recognizes both formats, so Outlook users can use any Microsoft Exchange Client view, as well as Outlook views. In contrast, Microsoft Exchange Client does not recognize the Outlook format, so Microsoft Exchange Client cannot use Outlook views by default. However, Outlook users can choose to maintain two copies of all saved table views in a folder automatically—one copy in Outlook format and one copy in Microsoft Exchange Client format.

        This workaround enables Microsoft Exchange Client users to use Outlook forms, although any Outlook-specific view features, such as formula fields, are not included in the Microsoft Exchange Client copy. Also, when a Microsoft Exchange Client user opens a folder, Microsoft Exchange Client displays only the views that have been saved in Microsoft Exchange Client format.

       Custom field types—All Outlook custom field types, such as formula and combination fields, are not viewable at all by Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x users.

       Rich text in message bodies—Like Microsoft Exchange Client users, Outlook users can format message text using rich text attributes such as bold, italic, and indent. Microsoft Mail 3.x, however, does not support rich text in messages. As a result, when an Outlook message with rich text is opened by a Microsoft Mail 3.x user, all rich text attributes are removed from the file and replaced by plain text.

       Attachments—Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can open attachments or objects within messages created by Microsoft Mail 3.x users, and vice versa. Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can also attach a message to another message. However, when Microsoft Mail 3.x users receive a message that has another message attached to it, they can view the original message, but they cannot view the attached message.

        Outlook users can also attach other Outlook items (such as a contact) to their messages. Recipients using Outlook can open these attachments and view the items in their appropriate Outlook forms. However, Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x users receive the items as attachments containing text only.

       Embedded hyperlinks—If an Outlook or Microsoft Exchange Client message recipient clicks an embedded World Wide Web-style hyperlink (a URL address of an Internet or intranet Web site) in a message created by another Outlook or Microsoft Exchange Client user, the recipient jumps to the appropriate Web site. If a Microsoft Mail 3.x user opens a message with an embedded hyperlink, the hyperlink is displayed in the message as plain text only.

       Unlimited message size—Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Server can create and read a message of any size (subject to available system resources), while Microsoft Mail 3.x has additional size restrictions for messages. Although Microsoft Mail 3.x users may not be able to open a very large message created by an Outlook or Microsoft Exchange Client user, they can save the message to a file or print it.

       HTML Formatted mail messages—Outlook 98 supports sending mail formatted as HTML and use of HTML mail to create “stationery”.  Outlook 97, Microsoft Exchange client and Mail 3.x users can’t send mail formatted with HTML and when they receive HTML messages the messages are displayed as plain text, without any images of formatting the original.

       Sending and Receiving vCards—Outlook 98 allows users to easily send and receive contact information using the Internet standard vCard format. Outlook 97 and the Microsoft Exchange client do not support this.  (The exception is Outlook 97 can support vCard via a free add-on, available on the Microsoft Outlook website.)

 

Using Public Folders

 

Outlook supports all the custom public folder view features of Microsoft Exchange Server. In fact, Microsoft Exchange Server does not distinguish between Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client when users open a public folder. For this reason, Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can have access to a common set of public folders. Microsoft Mail 3.x users, on the other hand, cannot access Outlook public folders, just as they cannot access Microsoft Exchange Client public folders.

When setting up public folders that Outlook users and Microsoft Exchange Client users will access, administrators should be familiar with the interoperability differences regarding non-table views and saved views, described in the “Exchanging Messages” section.

The following table summarizes public folder interoperability between Outlook, Microsoft Exchange Client, and Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows.

When this user

Looks at a public folder containing views created by
Microsoft Exchange Client

Looks at a public folder containing views created by Outlook

Looks at a public folder containing views created by Microsoft Exchange Client and Outlook

Microsoft Exchange Client

   Complete interoperability.

   If the folder has the Save Views in Exchange 4.0 Format property set, all Outlook table views appear as Microsoft Exchange Client views with the same name (without formula columns).

   Outlook non-table views (such as Calendar and Card views) do not appear in Microsoft Exchange Client.

 

   Microsoft Exchange Client views appear intermixed with Outlook views.

   If the folder has the Save Views in Exchange 4.0 Format property set, all Outlook table views appear as Microsoft Exchange Client views with the same name (without formula columns).

   Outlook non-table views (such as Calendar and Card views) do not appear in Microsoft Exchange Client.

Outlook

   Outlook automatically converts the view into Outlook format, leaving the Microsoft Exchange Client view intact.

   Any changes made by the Outlook user are also shadowed in Microsoft Exchange Client format.

 

   Complete interoperability.

 

   Microsoft Exchange Client views appear intermixed with Outlook views.

   Any changes made to Microsoft Exchange Client views are saved in both Microsoft Exchange Client and Outlook formats.

   Changes made to Outlook views are saved in Microsoft Exchange Client format if the Save Views in Exchange 4.0 Format property is set.

Microsoft Mail 3.x

Note: Microsoft Mail 3.x does not include the public folders feature.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x cannot access public folders created in Microsoft Exchange Client.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x cannot access public folders created in Outlook.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x cannot access public folders created in Outlook or Microsoft Exchange Client.

 

 

Other Messaging and Collaboration Features

 

This section describes Outlook, Microsoft Exchange Client, and Microsoft Mail 3.x interoperability differences in features that go beyond the basic capabilities of exchanging e-mail messages and using public folders.

 

Rules

 

Microsoft Exchange client has an interface to manage rules called the “Inbox Assistant”.  Outlook 97 and 98 include an enhanced rules user interface called the “Rules Wizard”.

The Outlook Rules Wizard enables users to manage their Microsoft Exchange Client Inbox Assistant rules (server side rules) along with their Outlook rules (client side rules). The Rules wizard allows users to easily recreate (convert) Inbox Assistant rules into Outlook rules. Each time the Outlook Rules Wizard is started, it checks for active Inbox Assistant rules on the user’s computer. If any exist, the Rules Wizard gives the user the option to convert them to Outlook rules automatically.  After an Inbox Assistant rule has been converted to an Outlook rule, users can modify it anytime by using the Outlook Rules Wizard. if an Inbox Assistant rule is converted to an Outlook rule, users cannot modify it in the Outlook Rules Wizard.

Note   The Rules Wizard is a built in feature of Outlook 98 for Win32. Outlook 97 Win32 users can download the Rules Wizard from http://www.microsoft.com/outlook at no cost. The Rules Wizard is not available for the Microsoft Exchange Client or Mail 3.x client.

 

Forms

 

Outlook Forms Forms created using the Outlook forms design environment can only be used by Outlook Win32 users.

EFD Forms – Forms created with the Microsoft Exchange Forms Designer (EFD) can be used by Outlook Win32, and Microsoft Exchange Client, but not by the Exchange Client for Macintosh or Microsoft Mail 3.x client.

Exchange Server 5.5 HTML Forms – Forms implemented using Exchange Server HTML interfaces can be used by Outlook Win32, 16 bit Windows and Macintosh, but not by the Microsoft Exchange or Mail 3.x clients.

As a result, you should plan for creating forms using the tool appropriate for the mix of operating systems in your organization. For more details about developing or modifying forms for Outlook, see the “Outlook Forms Design Environment” section of this paper, the Office Resource Kit, or the Building Outlook Information Sharing Solutions white paper.

 

WordMail

 

Microsoft Exchange Client users can choose either Microsoft Word 95 or Microsoft Word 97 for WordMail. Outlook users, however, must have Microsoft Word 97 installed to create messages using WordMail, although they can receive and read messages composed with either WordMail 95 or WordMail 97.

 

Voting

 

With Outlook Win32, users can easily create and send “ballot” messages to other Outlook users and track the voting responses in Outlook automatically. An Outlook user specifies the voting choices when creating the message, then sends the message to other users. When recipients using Outlook Win32, 16 bit Windows or Macintosh receive a voting message, the selections they can vote on appear as buttons in the Outlook message—a recipient votes with just a mouse click. The responses are logged in the original sender’s e-mail message [usually stored in the Sent Mail folder], where the original sender can check to determine the results of the votes.

When Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x users receive voting messages from Outlook users, they receive the text of the Subject line and body of the voting message. No voting buttons are displayed.

 

Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane

 

Outlook 97 provides some of the functionality — through different features and user interface approaches — offered by the Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane, an add-on feature that is included on the Microsoft Exchange Server Technical Resource CD. For example, Outlook enables users to preview the text of messages in their Inbox, without having to click each message. It also enables a user to view the size of messages and put reminders on any messages in his or her Inbox.

Outlook 98 has the Preview Pane built-in to the product. 

The following table illustrates how Outlook offers the functionality provided by the Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane.

 

This Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane feature

Is provided by Outlook this way

Preview pane itself

Outlook 97 offers a Preview Pane add-on on the Outlook Website.  Outlook 98 ships with the Preview Pane as part of the product.

In addition, the Outlook AutoPreview feature enables users to view the first 3 lines or 256 characters of any message, from within the view.

Users can turn AutoPreview on or off for all messages or unread messages. They can also turn it on or off completely.

Message reminders

Using the Outlook Message Flag feature, an Outlook user can put reminders on any messages in the Inbox.

Fixed font

Current plans for Outlook 97 and 98 do not include a fixed-font feature.

Folder size

Outlook 97 does not include a folder size feature.  Outlook 98 does include a folder size feature.

The Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane is not compatible with Outlook, and is therefore not recommended for use with Outlook.

Note   Outlook 97 and 98 are compatible with Outlook Express (which ships as part of Internet Explorer version 4.0).  Outlook and OE users can exchange e-mail, and Outlook users can send task information and meetings requests to OE users, who receive the items as text-only messages.  Outlook 98 has a Setup Wizard that automatically imports existing account, profile information and personal address books from Outlook Express.

 

Other Differences for Outlook Users

 

Outlook users may also notice these additional minor differences when they move to Outlook from Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows:

       Outlook includes commands for creating or deleting a public folder favorite on its File menu, but does not include toolbar buttons for them.

       Microsoft Exchange Client users can use Find and Replace commands with Microsoft Exchange standard message forms. Outlook supports the Find command in the Outlook standard message form, and, when using WordMail 97, Outlook users can also take advantage of the Replace command in messages.

       Outlook 97 stores one AutoSignature entry, while Outlook 98 and Microsoft Exchange Client can store multiple entries. Outlook 97 users can use Message Templates to create different signatures for different sets of recipients.  (Outlook 98 supports multiple signatures.)

       Read receipts are not generated when an Outlook user looks at a message using the Outlook AutoPreview feature and then deletes the message without first opening it.

 

Forms developed with this environment

Can be used by these clients

Exchange Server 5.5 HTML Forms

Outlook Win32, Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh

Exchange Forms Designer

Outlook Win32 and Win 16, and Microsoft Exchange Client Win32 and Win16

Outlook Forms

Outlook Win32

Office Forms

Outlook Win32

 

Outlook Forms Interoperability

 

Upgrading to Outlook also includes changes for users and developers who plan to take advantage of the advanced features in Outlook, such as its object model and its forms design capabilities. Advanced users and developers—as well as administrators—should read this section so they are aware of differences between Outlook and other Microsoft workgroup products.

Designers building or modifying forms for use in Outlook or mixed client environments should be familiar with the information in the following sections.

 

Exchange Forms Designer and Outlook Forms

 

In a mixed-client environment, designers must consider which clients will be using the forms they create. For example, the Microsoft Exchange Client (both the Win16 and Win32 versions) can run only Microsoft Exchange Forms Designer (EFD) forms. The Outlook client (Win32 only), on the other hand, can run both forms developed with EFD and forms developed with Outlook Forms. Therefore, in a mixed client environment, any forms that will be used by both Win16 and Win32 messaging users should be developed using EFD. Or, in an organization with Exchange Server 5.5 and Outlook 97 or 98 for Win32, Win16 and Macintosh all clients can run Exchange Server 5.5’s HTML forms.

 

 

Taking Advantage of the Enhanced Design Environment in Outlook

 

Like EFD, the Outlook forms design environment, Outlook Forms, offers a no-programming layout environment for building and deploying custom Microsoft Exchange forms. Outlook Forms also includes many enhancements to make it even easier to create world-class forms.

For example, forms created using Outlook Forms are fully 32-bit and interpreted—not compiled—so they’re small and fast. In addition, Outlook Forms supports expressions and validation, and designers can switch back and forth instantly between design and runtime. Outlook Forms also supports ActiveX controls. However, forms created with Outlook Forms cannot be modified or enhanced with Visual Basic (as EFD forms can), although designers can add custom behavior to Outlook forms easily by using Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript).

Outlook Forms also differs from EFD in that it enables designers to take advantage of familiar Microsoft Office document templates, such as Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel templates, to create Office 97 Document Forms.

 

Exchange Server HTML Forms

 

Outlook Forms created using the built-in Outlook forms design tool can only be used on Win32 desktops where Outlook is installed. However, Exchange Server provides an alternative means of creating forms for use in collaborative applications, using Active Server Pages and the Microsoft Exchange Collaboration Data Objects (CDO) interface to scripted forms that are displayed as HTML in a Web browser.  All three versions of Outlook in Exchange Server 5.5 (Outlook 97 8.03, Outlook 97 for Win3.X, and Outlook 97 for Macintosh) as well as Outlook 98 have been extended to support Exchange Server HTML forms. These features provide Exchange sites an option  for developing electronic forms that can be deployed across all operating systems.

All three versions of Outlook in Exchange 5.5 and Outlook 98 contain a new menu item on the Compose menu, Open Web Form, that lets users invoke an Exchange Server HTML form. When a user selects this menu item, the Web browser registered on the user’s computer is automatically opened, and directed to an internal web-site containing a directory of HTML forms.  The URL that locates the directory of HTML forms can be set as an option and can be set in registry keys by the system administrator.

Currently, when an Outlook form is sent to the Win3.X or Macintosh client, it is essentially unusable - opening the item in the Win3.X or Macintosh inbox does not display the actual form as the form designer intended. However, with Exchange Server 5.5 the Win3.X and Macintosh clients will automatically launch an associated HTML form when a user opens an Outlook form from their inbox, provided Outlook Web Access is installed and enabled on the server. This HTML form is created as an additional design step, and is not automatically generated during the design of the Outlook form. The Exchange administrator associates the HTML form with the appropriate Outlook form message class.

 

Messaging and Collaboration Interoperability Table

 

The following table summarizes the interoperability of Outlook with Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x. Client interoperability may be different depending on whether the clients are running on Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or in a mixed environment. The table indicates any server differences as well, to give you a big-picture view of Outlook interoperability.

If you are unsure about what any messaging or Collaboration term in this table means in this case, see “Appendix B: Terms Used in This White Paper.”

In this interoperability table, the term “mixed” in the server information indicates an environment in which both Microsoft Exchange Server and Microsoft Mail servers coexist.

This Outlook feature or capability

Works on these Microsoft workgroup servers

Works with these Microsoft workgroup clients

Sending and receiving e-mail messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   All (any combination of clients). However, Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x do not use the Outlook standard message form, so they display the Outlook message in the Microsoft Exchange Client standard message form or the Microsoft Mail 3.x standard message form, respectively.

   Because the Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x standard message forms do not support the advanced functionality of Outlook, they ignore its extended message properties, such as voting buttons and Reply By, when they display a message created by an Outlook user.

Views (including saved views)

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client and the Microsoft Mail 3.x client cannot display any Outlook non-table views.

   Microsoft Exchange Client and Outlook use different formats to create saved views. Outlook recognizes both formats, but Microsoft Exchange Client recognizes only its own format.

   Outlook users can use saved views created by Microsoft Exchange Client.

   Microsoft Exchange Client users cannot use saved views created by Outlook, unless the Outlook user has selected the Save views in Exchange 4.0 format property for the Outlook folder. If this property is selected, Microsoft Exchange Client users can view table views saved by Outlook users.

Custom field types

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client and the Microsoft Mail 3.x client cannot use some Outlook custom field types, such as formula fields.

Rich text in messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client support rich text in messages.

   The Microsoft Mail 3.x client does not support rich text, so it displays rich text in received messages as plain text.

Message attachments and embedded objects

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook, Microsoft Exchange Client, and Microsoft Mail 3.x users can send and receive messages with attachments.

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can also send and receive messages with embedded objects or other messages attached.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x does not support embedded objects or attached messages, and displays them as plain text in messages.

   As clients for a Microsoft Mail server, Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can receive attachments and embedded objects.

Embedded hyperlinks in messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client support messages with embedded hyperlink jumps.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x displays embedded hyperlinks as plain text.

Sending contact information as an Internet ‘vCard’ attachment.

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook 98 Win32 users can send and receive contact information using the Internet standard vCard format. Outlook 97 Win32 users can use an add-on available from http://www.microsoft.com/outlook to import and export contacts as vCards.

Public folders

a)  Microsoft Exchange Server or mixed

b)  Microsoft Mail Server

a)  Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client can use a common set of public folders, although Microsoft Exchange Client cannot display any non-table views created by Outlook users.

Microsoft Mail 3.x users cannot access Outlook or Microsoft Exchange Client public folders.

b)  None.

Rules

a)  Microsoft Exchange Server or mixed

b)  Microsoft Mail Server

a)  Outlook displays Inbox Assistant rules in its Rules Wizard. Users can use the Outlook Rules Wizard to re-create their Inbox Assistant rules for Outlook, or they can choose an Outlook option to modify them. Each time the Outlook Rules Wizard is started, it checks for active Inbox Assistant rules on the user’s computer and gives the user the option to convert them to Outlook rules automatically.

b)  Outlook (by means of the Rules Wizard), because Outlook rules can be stored on the client, as well as the server.

Forms

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server,  or mixed

   Outlook Win32, Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh versions can use Exchange Server 5.5 HTML forms.

   Outlook Win32 and Win 16, and Microsoft Exchange Client Win32 and Win16 can use EFD forms.

   Outlook Win32 can use Outlook or Office forms.

   No support for any forms by Microsoft Mail 3.x clients or MS DOS clients.

Message size

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client messages can be of any size (subject to system resources), whereas Microsoft Mail 3.x messages have additional size restrictions.

WordMail

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client can use either Microsoft Word 95 or Microsoft Word 97 for WordMail.

   Outlook users must use Microsoft Word 97 for WordMail.

 

 

Calendaring and Scheduling

 

Note   This section refers to the 32-bit Windows version of Outlook (not the Win 16 or Macintosh versions.)

Outlook gives Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users all the key features they currently have, in addition to many new information management capabilities. For example, new features Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users get when they upgrade to Outlook include:

       Integrated mail functions, along with journal and note features (in addition, the integrated contact feature in Outlook is new to Schedule+ 1.0 users)

       Additional views

       Advanced custom view capabilities

       Task delegation

       Advanced printing options

Except for its new features and enhanced user interface, users can think of Outlook as a straightforward upgrade for Microsoft Schedule+ 95 or Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0. They can continue working with their calendar information just as they did in their previous application—except previous Schedule+ 1.0 users can now also manage their contact information with Outlook Contacts. In addition, calendar sharing using the MS Mail server will not function the same as with S+ 1.0 and S+ 95 (see Appendix A).

In a mixed environment consisting of Outlook and Schedule+ 95 and/or Schedule+ 1.0 users, all users can exchange meeting request messages and share calendar free/busy status with each other. However, because many Outlook capabilities go beyond those of Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0, Outlook users should be aware that their coworkers who are still using Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 may not be able to view or use some of the messaging or calendar information the same way another Outlook user can.

This section provides important administration and upgrade notes, and describes Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 interoperability issues in more detail.

Note   Because Outlook 97 and 98 have the same file format, there is complete group scheduling interoperability between these two versions (i.e. send/receive meeting requests, viewing free/busy time blocks or details, and delegate access). 

 

Managing a Mixed Scheduling Environment

 

Although Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 offer a high level of interoperability for basic calendar and group scheduling capabilities, the interoperability differences described in this paper can affect more advanced levels of accessing each other’s calendars during the migration to Outlook.

For this reason, if a workgroup or organization transitioning to Outlook from Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 relies heavily on the ability to modify each other’s schedules, you may want to consider taking additional steps to ensure a smooth transition. The following suggestions can help you enable users in your organization to modify each other’s schedules seamlessly:

       Migrate all members of the workgroup at the same time, instead of in phases. This avoids the interoperability differences that could cause interruptions or confusion in the way the workgroup members share their calendar information with each other. In particular, if the workgroup (or Microsoft Mail postoffice) contains users who have assistants manage their schedules, you must migrate these users and their assistants at the same time.

       Upgrade conference room and resource accounts to Outlook last, after migrating all users. This will enable users to view free/busy details on these conference rooms and resources throughout the migration. If you move a conference room to Outlook before all users are upgraded to Outlook, Schedule+ users cannot view that conference room’s free/busy details.

       Make sure users do not delete their Schedule+ files before they run the Outlook Import/Export Wizard to import their Schedule+ data to Outlook. It is important that the .cal or .scd files be saved until the Outlook import process is complete.

       Choose the Outlook option for continuing to use Schedule+ 95 for group scheduling during the organization’s transition to Outlook. This will enable all users to open each others’ Schedule+ 95 schedules until the transition is complete. When all users have been upgraded to Outlook, they can clear the option and begin using Outlook for group scheduling, as well as for e-mail.

        Schedule+ users are prompted with this option when they install Outlook. In addition, administrators can turn on or off the Outlook group scheduling features for groups of users simultaneously. Using Standard Windows 95 profiles and remote registry support, system administrators can set the registry key, UseSchedPlus -- a Reg DWord under HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Office\8.0\Outlook\SchedPlusOption -- to turn on or off Outlook group scheduling features for large numbers of users. For groups of users, administrators can also "lock in" the option to use Schedule+ for group scheduling by adding the following value UserCanChange under Reg DWord under HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Office\8.0\Outlook\SchedPlusOption   . This ensures that users don't individually move to Outlook for group scheduling until the administrator is ready for them to.

        Note   The option to use Schedule+ 95 for group scheduling is made at the computer level, not the user level. For example, if multiple users work from the same computer, the Outlook option to use Schedule+ for group scheduling applies to all users working from that computer. For this reason, users who share a computer must migrate to Outlook simultaneously.

        If you have Outlook users who have been using Schedule+ 95 for group scheduling, before switching them (or allowing them to switch) to using Outlook for scheduling, make sure they are aware that Outlook cannot export data back to Schedule+ 95. Once users import their Schedule+ 95 data to Outlook, they cannot convert it back into Schedule+ 95 format. In addition, future meetings they accept from within the Outlook Inbox will be added to their Outlook calendars, instead of to their Schedule+ calendars. These meeting requests cannot be re-read from within Schedule+ 95. Note that after a user imports Schedule+ data to Outlook, Outlook prompts the user to choose whether to continue using Schedule+ as the primary calendar, or to move to Outlook for calendar functionality.

 

Upgrading and Importing Scheduling Data to Outlook

 

To begin using Outlook, Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users simply install Outlook and use the Outlook Import Wizard to import their Schedule+ 95 schedule (.scd) or Schedule+ 1.0 calendar (.cal) files. A separate set of utilities provided with Microsoft Exchange Server imports Microsoft Mail and competitive message stores to MAPI format. For more detailed information about upgrading from Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 to Outlook, see the Outlook product documentation.

When a Schedule+ 95 user upgrades to Outlook, permissions need to be reset.  This is due to different file formats. 

Note   Outlook uses specific Schedule+ 95 files to import the Schedule+ 1.0 .cal file. If the necessary Schedule+ 95 files are not installed on the same computer from which you are running Outlook, Outlook does not give you the option to import a Schedule+ 1.0 .cal file.

Although Outlook does not automatically remove Schedule+ 95 from users’ computers, Outlook Setup gives users the option to remove Schedule+ 95 and remove any unnecessary Schedule+ 95 files. Leaving Schedule+ on Outlook users’ computers helps ensure a smooth migration, as you saw in “Managing a Mixed Scheduling Environment.”

 

Basic Group Scheduling Capabilities

 

For most organizations, two scheduling functionality areas are considered essential and therefore cannot be interrupted or broken during a migration:

       Exchanging meeting requests

       Viewing free/busy status

Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 interoperate completely in both of these key areas.

As you read this section, you should be familiar with the distinction between free/busy status and free/busy details:

       Free/busy status—The time blocks during which time the user is available for a meeting or busy. When users publish their free/busy status, other users can view the free/busy time blocks (but not necessarily their free/busy details) from within the Meeting Planner.

       Free/busy details—The descriptions (details) of the appointments or activities a user has scheduled. Users who have been given at least Read permission to another user’s calendar can not only view (in the Meeting Planner) the time blocks representing when that user is free or busy, but they can also view the user’s free/busy details.

 

Exchanging Meeting Request Messages

 

Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 users can freely exchange meeting messages across Windows and Macintosh platforms.

Although Outlook users and Schedule+ 1.0 users can freely exchange meeting requests and responses, Schedule+ 1.0 does not recognize the advanced features of Outlook (such as attachments, the meeting location field, and recurring meetings). As a result, when a Schedule+ 1.0 user receives a meeting message from an Outlook user, Schedule+ 1.0 ignores any Outlook-specific message features it does not recognize. For example, if an Outlook user sends a recurring meeting request to a Schedule+ 1.0 user, the Schedule+ 1.0 user receives only the first meeting request.

 

Viewing Free/Busy Status

 

When users “publish” their free/busy status, other users can view the free/busy time blocks (but not necessarily their free/busy details) from within the Meeting Planner. With appropriate permission, Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 users can view each other’s free/busy status (time blocks).

In addition to designating free/busy status, Outlook users can designate “tentative” and “out of office” time blocks for specific appointments. When Outlook users view each other’s calendars, they can identify which time blocks are free, busy, tentative, or “out of office.” When Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 users view an Outlook user’s calendar in their Planners, time blocks designated by the Outlook user as tentative appear as free times to the Schedule+ users. However, time blocks designated by the Outlook user as “out of office” appear as busy times to Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 users.

Outlook differs slightly from Schedule+ in how it handles unpublished free/busy status. When a Schedule+ user chooses not to publish his or her free/busy status, other Schedule+ users who have at least Read permission for that user’s schedule can still view the user’s free/busy status in their Meeting Planners. However, when an Outlook user chooses not to publish his or her free/busy status, other Outlook users—even those who have at least Read Only permission for that user’s schedule—cannot view the user’s free/busy status in their Meeting Planners. To view the user’s unpublished free/busy status, Outlook users must view (open) the user’s calendar, providing that they have appropriate permission.

By default, Outlook publishes three months of free/busy status for all users. Users can change the number of months or choose not to publish their free/busy status to others at all (by specifying 0 months). Users set the number of months of free/busy status that is published by clicking Options from the Tools menu, then Calendar, and then clicking Advanced. Then, in Publish X months of free/busy status, users enter 0 (zero).

 

Other Group Scheduling and Calendar Features

 

The following sections describe differences that exist in how Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 interoperate.

Opening other users' calendars

 

Schedule+ 95 users cannot open an Outlook user’s calendar. As a result, Schedule+ 95 users cannot view free/busy details of an Outlook user’s calendar. Outlook users, on the other hand, can open Schedule+ 95 users’ calendars with appropriate permission, and can therefore view a Schedule+ 95 user’s free/busy details.

The following table summarizes how Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 interoperate when users open each other’s calendars.

 

When a user running this client

Opens the calendar or views free/busy details of a user or resource that is running Outlook

Opens the calendar or views free/busy details of a user or resource that is running Schedule+ 95

Opens the calendar or views free/busy details of a user or resource that is running Schedule+ 1.0

Outlook

   Complete interoperability.

   Complete interoperability.

   Complete interoperability.

Schedule+ 95

   No interoperability to open calendar. Schedule+ 95 Win16 and Win32 can view free/busy details if they’ve installed a driver available from Microsoft. See the Note following this table.

   Complete interoperability.

   Complete interoperability.

Schedule+ 1.0

   No interoperability.

   No interoperability.

   User can open the other user’s calendar only.

 

Viewing another user's free/busy details (with read-only access)

 

       An Outlook user can display the free or busy details of Schedule+ 95 (all users on Microsoft Exchange Server), and Schedule+ 1.0 users.

       Win32 and Win16 Schedule+ 95 users are able to view details of an Outlook user (if all users are on Exchange Server) and if a driver has been installed.  The free driver is posted on the Microsoft Outlook Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/outlook) and available in Microsoft Exchange Server 5.0 SP1 or Exchange Server 5.5 (Outlook 8.03).

       Schedule+ 95 Macintosh users cannot view Outlook users’ free/busy details.

       Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot view Outlook users’ free/busy details.

Delegate access

 

Just as they can give others permission to read or modify their folders, users can designate other users to be their “delegates.” As a delegate, a user can manage the owner’s e-mail and schedule, as well as create, send, and reply to messages (including meeting and task requests) on the owner’s behalf. For example, managers may give their assistants or teams access to their schedules so the assistants or team members can create messages, appointments, tasks, or other items for them.

A delegate relationship requires both users to be running the same scheduling client. For example, Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users. However, a Schedule+ 95 user cannot be a delegate for an Outlook user, nor can an Outlook user be a delegate for a Schedule+ 95 user.

Outlook users who want to participate in delegate relationships with other Outlook users must keep all their primary folders (such as Calendar and Inbox) on the server, instead of on their local computers.

The following table summarizes how Outlook, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0 interoperate when users access each other’s information as delegates.

 

When a user running this client

Accesses the calendar of an Outlook user or resource as delegate

Accesses the calendar of a Schedule+ 95 user or resource

Accesses the calendar of a Schedule+ 1.0 user or resource

Outlook

   Complete interoperability.

   No interoperability.

   No interoperability.

Schedule+ 95

   No interoperability.

   Complete interoperability.

   No interoperability.

Schedule+ 1.0

   No interoperability.

   No interoperability.

   Complete interoperability.

Schedule+ 95 users can designate other users to be their “delegate owners.” As a delegate owner, a user has all the capabilities of a delegate, plus he or she can designate additional delegates for the owner’s schedule.

Like Schedule+ 95 users, Outlook folder owners can enable their delegates to give other users the necessary permission for accessing the owner’s folders. However, Outlook does not enable a delegate to designate additional delegates for the owner’s folders. To designate a delegate in Outlook, you must be logged on as the folder (account) owner.

Note   When Outlook is a client for a Microsoft Mail server, Outlook users cannot give other Outlook users access to their folders.

 

Direct booking

 

If they have appropriate permission, Outlook users can take advantage of the Schedule+ direct booking feature to book appointments into a Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 calendar directly. However, Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot book appointments into Outlook calendars directly. In addition, Outlook users cannot book appointments into other Outlook calendars directly.

Outlook helps users get into the habit of organizing meetings by sending meeting requests, instead of booking appointments directly into other users’ calendars, as was necessary on some mainframe systems. However, with appropriate permission (such as Delegate), an Outlook user can open another Outlook user’s or resource’s calendar and modify it if necessary.

The following table describes how Outlook, Schedule+95, and Schedule+ 1.0 interoperate when users try to book meetings into each other’s calendars directly.

 

When a user running this client

Directly books an appointment in the calendar of a resource running Outlook

Directly books an appointment in the calendar of a resource running Schedule+ 95

Directly books an appointment in the calendar of a resource running Schedule+ 1.0

Outlook

   User can open resource’s calendar and add an appointment. However, Outlook does not offer a specific “direct booking” feature.

   Complete interoperability.

 

   Complete interoperability.

Schedule+ 95

   No interoperability.

   Complete interoperability.

 

   No interoperability.

Schedule+ 1.0

   No interoperability.

   No interoperability.

 

   Complete interoperability.

With direct booking, no meeting request is actually sent to the Schedule+ resource. The meeting organizer’s client software simply adds the meeting directly into the Schedule+ resource’s calendar. Because a directly booked Schedule+ resource is unlikely to receive meeting requests, it is not required that you assign a delegate to the resource or have a continuously running computer logged into the resource’s account to process incoming meeting requests. However, without a delegate or continuously running computer for the Schedule+ resource, if a user does send an explicit meeting request to the resource instead of booking an appointment directly, the meeting request will go unnoticed until a user actually logs on to the resource’s account.

Unlike Schedule+ accounts, however, Outlook accounts cannot be booked directly. There are alternatives to address this:

1.     For Exchange Server 5.5 or later a server agent script can be installed on the resource’s mailbox to automatically process  meeting requests sent to the Outlook resource. For more information on this approach see the Outlook Web site at http://www.microsoft.com/outlook or contact your Microsoft sales representative.

2.     Each Outlook resource account can be set up with a delegate that receives its meeting requests. The delegate account should be logged in on a continuously running computer. Because a single delegate can be responsible for multiple resource accounts, a single, dedicated “delegate computer” can handle a large number of conference rooms and other resources.

Note   When Outlook is a client for a Microsoft Mail server, Outlook users cannot take advantage of the Outlook delegate access capabilities. For this reason, resource accounts on a Microsoft Mail server should be Schedule+ 95 accounts, so both Outlook users and Schedule+ users can book appointments into them directly.

 

Tasks

 

Outlook gives users new task features that are not available in Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0:

       Additional views—Outlook provides additional views for task items, making it easier for users to manage tasks the way that best suits their needs.

       Task delegation—Outlook enables users to delegate tasks to other users. When an Outlook user delegates a task to another Outlook user, all the task’s information (such as start date, end date, and status) is sent as a special task request message to the recipient, who can add it to his or her own Task List automatically. However, when an Outlook user delegates a task to a user who is running Microsoft Exchange Client or Microsoft Mail 3.x, the recipient receives only an e-mail message that lists the task’s description, start and end dates, and other information as text in the body of the message.

Users may import their Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 task data any time after Outlook is installed, using the Outlook Import Wizard. By default, Outlook imports Schedule+ task information into the Outlook Tasks folder. Users can choose to ignore or replace any duplicate entries encountered during the import process.

 

Contacts

 

Outlook provides a rich Contacts feature that helps users keep their business and personal contact information up to date. Although Schedule+ 95 includes some contact features, many of the Outlook contact management enhancements are not available in Schedule+ 95:

       Additional views—Outlook provides additional contact views that are not available in Schedule+ 95.

       Combined contacts and e-mail addresses—The enhanced Contacts feature enables Outlook users to include e-mail addresses with their contacts. Outlook users can import all Schedule+ 95 contacts, as well as contacts stored in Microsoft Exchange Client personal address books (PABs). In addition, Outlook users can use their Contacts as their personal e-mail address books, so they no longer need to maintain individuals’ names and e-mail addresses in two separate places.

        Users should understand the following PAB and Contacts issues so they can manage their contacts and e-mail distribution lists effectively:

       Users can store e-mail distribution lists in their PABs, but they cannot store them (in the same way) in their Outlook Contacts. So users who maintain distribution lists can use their Contacts as their list of individual e-mail recipients and use their PABs for their collection of e-mail distribution lists.

        However, users can easily use their Contacts to duplicate the effect of personal distribution lists by following these quick steps:

1.     For each recipient to be included in this distribution, create an Outlook contact that includes the recipient’s e-mail address.

2.     Create a custom category to represent the set of users on your conceptual “distribution list,” then add this category to the appropriate contacts in Outlook.

3.     Using the View Selector in Contacts, select the By Category view. Then, without expanding the category name, click and drag the entire category into the Inbox icon on the Outlook Bar.

        Outlook creates a new message and adds all the contacts in the selected category to the To line.

       To add e-mail addresses to their PABs, users click Add to PAB in appropriate dialog boxes. To add e-mail addresses to their Outlook Contacts, users select the e-mail address and then drag it to the Contacts icon on the Outlook Bar, or right-click the e-mail address and click the Add to Outlook Address Book item from the resulting drop-down list.

       While users can add a public folder to their PABs, they cannot add a public folder to their Contacts list.

       When the e-mail address for an Outlook contact has the Always send mail in Exchange rich text format option selected, this option is not recognized when that e-mail address is selected later from the Outlook Address Book. To work around this difference, the Outlook user can type the e-mail address directly in the To line of the message and then choose the Always send mail in Exchange rich text format option from within the message. Or, the user can add the e-mail address to his or her PAB and set the option from within the PAB.

       Outlook 98 Win32 users can send and receive contact information using the Internet standard vCard format. Outlook 97 Win32 users can use an add-on available from http://www.microsoft.com/outlook to import and export contacts as vCards.

Users may import their Schedule+ contact data any time after Outlook is installed, using the Import And Export command on the Outlook File menu. By default, Outlook imports Schedule+ contact information into Outlook’s Contacts folder. Users can choose to ignore or replace any duplicate entries encountered during the import process. The Outlook Import Wizard also imports Microsoft Exchange Client PABs.

 

Calendar Synchronization for Outlook 97

 

Although Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 synchronize calendars the same way, Outlook 97’s calendar synchronization method is different. Schedule+ maintains two copies of a user’s calendar — a local copy and a server copy. By default, Schedule+ runs primarily from a local calendar and automatically synchronizes the local and server calendars each time the user connects to the server.

With Outlook 97, users work directly on the server-based calendar by default, so there is less need for automatic background replication. In addition, a single calendar file, residing on the server, provides additional security and manageability. Disconnected users also benefit from the tight integration of Outlook 97 with Microsoft Exchange Server: a single command and a single phone call synchronize all folders—calendar, e-mail, public folders, contacts, and tasks.

Although working directly on the server-based calendar is default Outlook 97 behavior, users can choose to have both a server and a local copy of their Outlook 97 folder. For example, users who travel frequently or need the ability to access their Outlook 97 information from an off-line store may want to take advantage of this ability. In such cases, users can configure Outlook 97 to synchronize the folders automatically whey they log on and/or log off.

Outlook 98 however, uses a similar synchronization model as Schedule+ 95.  Outlook 98 automatically configures important default folders such as the Calendar to work from a local synchronized folder, and synchronizes the local folder with Microsoft Exchange Server periodically.  This model improves performance for Outlook 98 users, and decreases the load on Microsoft Exchange Server.

 

Other Calendar Features

 

Outlook users will also notice the following differences when they move to Outlook from Microsoft Schedule+ 95:

       Timex DataLink watches—The Outlook user interface enhancements make it even easier for users to download their Outlook information into their Timex DataLink watches.

       Covey Seven Habits—Outlook does not include the Covey Seven Habits feature that is included in Schedule+ 95.

       Enhanced printing capabilities—Outlook provides advanced printing capabilities that give previous Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users more flexibility in printing their schedules, and that enable them to print their schedules to fit a variety of paper formats. (Note that the Outlook enhanced OLE Automation interface does not support the Schedule+ 95 printing language.)

       Private items—When an Outlook user marks an item (such as an e-mail or calendar item) as Private, other Outlook users cannot view the item. However, users running Microsoft Exchange Client can view the item if they have been granted folder access privileges for the folder in which that item is stored. Because Outlook folder-level privacy is absolute, the Outlook workaround for this functionality difference is to have Outlook users put items that they want to keep private in a separate folder that they don’t share or on which they have set restrictions.

 

Internet Services

 

Publish a read-only Calendar to the Web – An add-on utility, Internet Assistant for Microsoft Schedule+ 95, makes it easy for Schedule+ 95 users to publish calendar or free/busy information on a Web site of their choice (either on the Internet or on an intranet). With this tool, Schedule+ 95 users can publish static information from personal calendars, team calendars, or event schedules on the Web, and view the information with a Web browser that duplicates the familiar Schedule+ 95 user interface. A similar utility will be is expected to be available for Outlook from the Outlook web site at http://www.microsoft.com/outlook.

Calendar access from the Internet – Outlook takes advantage of Microsoft Exchange Web Services in Exchange Server 5.5 and later to enable Outlook users to use any Web browser to access  their Outlook data including their Calendar. This Exchange Server feature is known as Outlook Web Access.  With Outlook Web Access, users will be able to work with their Outlook folders over the Internet (or an intranet) as HTML pages, without needing to have Outlook installed on the computers they are using. For example, traveling Outlook users may have access to the Internet or the corporate intranet, but may not have access to a computer that has Outlook installed. Using Outlook Web Access, these users can access their Outlook data (including e-mail, calendar, and Public Folder data), using only the installed Web browser.  Outlook Web Access gives users the benefit of Windows NT reliable intranet and Internet security, with a user interface that is familiar and convenient for Outlook users.

Group Scheduling over the Internet – Outlook 98 Win32 allows users in organizations without Exchange Server, and home users, to publish and download free/busy information from Internet servers using the iCalendar Internet standard, and to send and receive meeting requests and responses formatted in the vCalendar Internet standard format. These features are not available in Outlook 97, Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0.

 

Integration with Microsoft Project 95

 

Microsoft Project 95 takes advantage of Microsoft Schedule+ 95 and Microsoft Exchange Client to create an integrated environment in which project managers can assign tasks to other users automatically. Project managers running Microsoft Project 95, Schedule+ 95, and Microsoft Exchange Client can assign Schedule+ tasks — through e-mail messages — to other users. If the recipients accept the tasks and are running Schedule+ 95, the tasks are automatically added to their Schedule+ Task Lists. The project manager can also send users a message to request their project status. When Schedule+ 95 users reply to these status requests, Microsoft Project uses the information in their Schedule+ Task Lists to generate a status reply message automatically.

Microsoft Project 95 users will also be able to assign tasks to Outlook users. However, if the Outlook recipients accept the tasks, Microsoft Project 95 will not add the tasks to their Outlook Tasks automatically. Plans for future versions of Microsoft Project include the Schedule+ functionality described above, as well as additional Outlook integration functionality.

 

Integration with Project 98

 

The workgroup features of Project 98 integrate with Outlook similar to how previous versions of Project integrated with Microsoft Mail and Schedule+.  In order for team members to use these features, they need to run the workgroup setup routine that project managers can distribute to their team (there is no charge for this).  This setup allows team members to view the custom email messages that Microsoft Project generates.  Project managers can use the TeamAssign feature to send custom email messages to team members to assign them project tasks, and these messages are received in the team member's Outlook inbox.

Once the team member has officially "accepted" the task and sent his/her response back to the project manager, the tasks are automatically logged in the team member's Outlook Task List.  The tasks are grouped under a new category that corresponds to the project name.  The team member can then keep track of his/her task status (using the % complete field in the task list) right in the Outlook task list.  With previous versions of Project, project managers had to send TeamStatus messages to team members in order for the team members to submit status reports. However Project 98 adds a new menu item called “New TeamStatus Report” to the Outlook Tasks menu.  This allows team members to generate and submit TeamStatus reports without waiting for the project manager to ask for them.

When the team member selects this command, a custom "TeamStatus" e-mail message is created and stored in the Outlook inbox.  If he/she has been tracking task status in the task list, then that status information is automatically added to the TeamStatus report.  Users can then simply open it and send it along to the project manager.  In addition, they can also use the TeamStatus message to track task status, save and store it in the Inbox until they are ready to submit it to the project manager.

Microsoft Project 98 offers additional integration with Outlook. From within Project, Outlook reminders can be set up.  Project items can be journaled in Outlook. 

 

Other Differences for Outlook Users

 

Outlook users may also notice these additional minor differences when they move to Outlook from Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0:

       Outlook 97 users must keep all their personal folders either on the server or on their local computers. They cannot work primarily from a local file for their calendars while maintaining their mailboxes on a server.  (Does not apply to Outlook 98.) 

       The Outlook enhanced meeting organization interface in the Meeting Planner, including the Plan a Meeting feature, makes a Meeting Wizard unnecessary.

       Outlook streamlines task prioritization by offering three priority levels: High, Medium, or Low. However, when Outlook imports task data from Schedule+, it maintains the Schedule+ priority level information for each item. Users can view the Schedule+ priority level for that item in Outlook by adding the Schedule+ priority column to their Tasks view.

        Although Outlook users may assign any of these priorities to any of their tasks, they cannot assign them to projects or task categories.

       Outlook does not include a default Yearly view, although users achieve the same result easily by dragging to display several months of the Date Picker in the Calendar view.

       Outlook does not include a Number of Days command on its View menu, although users can display multiple days while they are working with their calendars.

       Outlook does not include Private and Reminder toolbar buttons, although these options are easy to set from within an item’s dialog box.

       Outlook users are not prompted to include travel time for meetings.

 

Using the Outlook Enhanced OLE Automation Interface

 

Schedule+ and Outlook provide different OLE Automation interfaces, or object models. Outlook includes a new object model that not only offers equivalent functionality to that of Schedule+, but it also offers even more capabilities. The Outlook automation library offers developers broader and more complete access to methods and properties of all Outlook items than the Schedule+ libraries provided. In addition, because the Microsoft Outlook library is well aligned with other Microsoft Office object models, developers benefit from its high level of consistency and standardization.

Schedule+ 95 applications must be revised to be compatible with the Outlook enhanced object model. In the Outlook online Help, Microsoft will provide detailed information about the Outlook object model. This information can help developers determine how they will need to update their Schedule+ 95 applications to work with Outlook.

 

Calendaring and Scheduling Interoperability Table

 

The following table summarizes Outlook interoperability with Microsoft Exchange Client, Microsoft Mail 3.x, Microsoft Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0. Client interoperability may be different depending on whether the clients are running on Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail 3.x, or in a mixed environment. The table indicates any server differences as well, to give you a big-picture view of Outlook interoperability.

If you are unsure about what any calendaring or group scheduling term in this table means in this case, see “Appendix B: Terms Used in This White Paper.”

In this interoperability table, the term “mixed” in the server information indicates an environment in which both Microsoft Exchange Server and Microsoft Mail servers coexist.

 

This Outlook feature or capability

Works on these Microsoft workgroup servers

Works with these Microsoft workgroup clients

Sending and receiving meeting requests or task requests

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   All (any combination of clients) can exchange meeting requests freely. However, Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot take advantage of Outlook message features, such as recurring meetings.

   When an Outlook user sends a task request (delegating a task) to Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 users, the Schedule+ users see the contents of the task request as body text only.

Viewing another user’s (published) free/busy status

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   All (any combination of clients) can view each other’s published free/busy status.

Viewing another user’s (shared but not published) free/busy status

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server or mixed

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can view other Outlook users’ shared but not published free/busy status.

Outlook users can also view Schedule+ 95 users’ free/busy status if the necessary Schedule+ 95 files are installed on the Outlook user’s computer. In this case, Outlook actually opens Schedule+ 95 and uses the Schedule+ 95 Meeting Planner to display the Schedule+ 95 user’s free/busy status.

Outlook users cannot view Schedule+ 1.0 users’ shared but not published free/busy status.

b) None.

c) Users of Schedule+ 1.0 or Schedule+ 95 cannot see Outlook users’ shared free/busy status.

Opening another user’s calendar

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server or mixed

a) Outlook users can open each other’s calendars.

Outlook users can open a Schedule+ 95 user’s calendar if Schedule+ 95 is installed on the Outlook user’s computer. In this case, Outlook opens Schedule+ 95 and displays the other user’s calendar in Schedule+ 95 instead of in Outlook.

Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot open Outlook users’ calendars.

b) Outlook users can open each other’s calendars, but they cannot open Schedule+ 95 users’ calendars.

Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot open Outlook users’ calendars.

Viewing another user’s free/busy details

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook users can view the free/busy details of Schedule+ 95 or other Outlook users in the Meeting Planner (right mouse click) if all users are on Exchange Server.  Outlook can also view details of Schedule+ 1.0 users, (right mouse click in the Outlook Meeting Planner.) 

   Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot view Outlook users’ free/busy details.

   Win 16 Schedule+ 7.0 and Win 32 Schedule+ 95 users can view Outlook users’ free/busy details if the appropriate driver is installed.  (See http://www.microsoft.com/outlook for information on these drivers.)

Delegate access (such as reading and writing into another user’s calendar)

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users, but they cannot be delegates for Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 users.

b) Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users if bother users set the Outlook option to use Schedule+ 95 for scheduling.

c) Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot be delegates for an Outlook user.

Directly booking a meeting into another user’s calendar

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can book meetings into Schedule+ 95 conference rooms or resources directly.

b) Outlook users can book meetings directly into Schedule+ 1.0 or Schedule+ 95 conference rooms or resources.

c) Users of Schedule+ 1.0 or Schedule+ 95 cannot write an appointment into an Outlook user’s calendar.

Outlook users cannot book into another Outlook user’s calendar directly, but they can duplicate the functionality by opening the user’s calendar.

Permissions

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server or mixed

   When a user upgrades from Schedule+ 1.0 or Schedule+ 95 to Outlook, all permissions must be reset.  Permissions are not automatically upgraded to Outlook.

Task delegation

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook users can delegate tasks to users of Outlook, Schedule+ 95, or Schedule+ 1.0 by sending task request messages.

   When Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 users receive a task request message, the task information is displayed as body text only.

Contacts

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook contacts can include e-mail addresses and can therefore be used to send messages.

   Schedule+ 95 contacts can include e-mail address information, but they cannot be used to address messages.

   Schedule+ 1.0 does not include a contacts feature.

   Only Outlook 98 and 97 Win32 support exchanging contacts as a vCard. Outlook 97 requires an add-on.

Import Schedule+ appointments, contacts, and tasks

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook imports Schedule+ 1.0 or Schedule+ 95 data.

Group Scheduling over the Internet

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook 98 Win32 allows users in organizations without Exchange Server, and home users, to publish and download free/busy information from Internet servers using the iCalendar Internet standard, and to send and receive meeting requests and responses formatted in the vCalendar Internet standard format. These features are not available in Outlook 97, Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0.

 

Appendix A: Interoperability Summaries by Client

 

The tables in this section give you an overview of Outlook interoperability with each Microsoft messaging and collaboration client: Microsoft Exchange Client, Microsoft Mail 3.x client, Schedule+ 95, and Schedule+ 1.0. If you are unsure about the intended meaning of a messaging or scheduling term used in one of these tables, see “Appendix B: Terms Used in This White Paper.”

 

Outlook 97 and 98 Win32 Interoperability with Outlook 97 Win16, Outlook 97 Macintosh and Microsoft Exchange Client

 

The following table summarizes interoperability differences users should know about when they upgrade to Outlook from Microsoft Exchange Client.

Important Note   Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 shipped with Outlook 97 clients for 16 bit Windows and Macintosh. The features of these clients are very similar to the Microsoft Exchange clients shipped with Exchange server 5.0 and earlier. In the following table, information about interoperability of Outlook with the Microsoft Exchange Client also applies to Outlook 97 and 98 Win32’s interoperability with Outlook 97 for 16 bit Windows and Macintosh unless otherwise noted. 

 

This Outlook 97 and 98 Win32 feature or capability

On these Microsoft workgroup servers

Interoperates this way with Outlook97 Win16 and Macintosh, and Microsoft Exchange Client

Sending and receiving e-mail messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Both clients can exchange messages freely. However, Microsoft Exchange Client does not use the Outlook standard message form, so it displays the Outlook message in the Microsoft Exchange Client standard message form.

   Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh clients for Exchange can exchange voting messages and messages with Follow Up Flags such as “Reply By”.

   Microsoft Exchange Client does not support the advanced functionality of Outlook, it ignores Outlook message properties, such as voting buttons and Follow up Flags such as Reply By, when it displays a message created by an Outlook user.

Views (including saved views)

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client cannot display any Outlook non-table views.

   Microsoft Exchange Client and Outlook use different formats to create saved views. Outlook recognizes both formats, but Microsoft Exchange Client recognizes only its own format.

   Outlook users can use saved views created by Microsoft Exchange Client.

   Microsoft Exchange Client users cannot use saved views created by Outlook, unless the Outlook user has selected the Save views in Exchange 4.0 format property for the Outlook folder. If this property is selected, Microsoft Exchange Client users can view table views saved by Outlook users.

Custom field types

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client cannot use some Outlook custom field types, such as formula fields.

Rich text in messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client support rich text in messages.

Message attachments and embedded objects

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can send and receive messages with attachments and embedded objects.

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can also send and receive messages that have other messages attached.

   As clients for a Microsoft Mail server, Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client users can receive attachments and embedded objects.

Embedded hyperlinks in messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client support messages with embedded hyperlink jumps.

Sending contact information as an Internet ‘vCard’ attachment.

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Only Outlook97 and 98 Win32 can import and export contacts as vCards.

Public folders

a) Microsoft Exchange Server or mixed

b) Microsoft Mail Server

a) Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client can use a common set of public folders, although Microsoft Exchange Client cannot display any non-table views created by Outlook users.

b) Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client public folders are not supported on Microsoft Mail Server.

Rules

a) Microsoft Exchange Server or mixed

b) Microsoft Mail Server

a) Outlook displays Inbox Assistant rules in its Rules Wizard. Users can use the Outlook Rules Wizard to re-create their Inbox Assistant rules for Outlook, or they can choose an Outlook option to modify them. Each time the Outlook Rules Wizard is started, it checks for active Inbox Assistant rules on the user’s computer and gives the user the option to convert them to Outlook rules automatically.

b) When Outlook is a client on Microsoft Mail Server, Outlook users can continue to use rules (by using the Rules Wizard) because Outlook rules can be stored on the client, as well as the server.

Forms

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook Win32, Outlook 97 Win16 and Macintosh versions can use Exchange Server 5.5 HTML forms.

   Outlook Win32 and Win 16, and Microsoft Exchange Client Win32 and Win16 can use EFD forms.

   Only Outlook Win32 can use Outlook or Office forms.

   No support for any forms by Microsoft Mail 3.x clients or MS DOS clients.

Message size

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client messages can be of any size (subject to system resources).

WordMail

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client users can use either Microsoft Word 95 or Microsoft Word 97 for WordMail.

   Outlook users must use Microsoft Word 97 for WordMail.

 

Outlook Interoperability with Microsoft Mail 3.x Client

 

The following table summarizes interoperability differences users should know about when they upgrade to Outlook from Microsoft Mail 3.x.

 

This Outlook feature or capability

On these Microsoft workgroup servers

Interoperates this way between Outlook and the Microsoft Mail 3.x for Windows client

Sending and receiving e-mail messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Both clients can exchange messages freely. However, Microsoft Mail 3.x ignores Outlook message properties, such as voting buttons and follow up flags such as “Reply By”.

Views

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Mail 3.x client cannot display any Outlook non-table views.

Custom field types

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x client cannot use some of Outlook’s custom field types, such as formula fields.

Rich text in messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Exchange Client support rich text in messages.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x client does not support rich text, so it displays rich text in received messages as plain text.

Message attachments and embedded objects

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Microsoft Mail 3.x users can send and receive messages with attachments.

   Outlook users can also send and receive messages with embedded objects or other messages attached.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x does not support embedded objects or attached messages, and displays them as plain text in messages.

Embedded hyperlinks in messages

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook supports messages with embedded hyperlink jumps.

   Microsoft Mail 3.x displays embedded hyperlinks as plain text.

Sending contact information as an Internet ‘vCard’ attachment.

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Only Outlook97 and 98 Win32 can import and export contacts as vCards.

Public folders

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Mail 3.x users cannot access Outlook public folders.

   Public folders are not supported on Microsoft Mail Server.

Forms

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Microsoft Mail 3.x client cannot view or use any personal or public folder forms created in Outlook with Outlook Forms.

Message size

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook messages can be of any size (subject to system resources), whereas Microsoft Mail 3.x messages have additional size restrictions.

 

Outlook Interoperability with Microsoft Schedule+ 95

 

The following table summarizes interoperability differences users should know about when they upgrade to Outlook from Schedule+ 95.

 

This Outlook feature or capability

On these Microsoft workgroup servers

Interoperates this way between Outlook and
Microsoft Schedule+ 95

Sending and receiving meeting requests or task requests

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Both users can exchange meeting requests freely.

   When an Outlook user sends a task request (delegating a task) to a Schedule+ 95 user, the Schedule+ 95 user receives the contents of the task request as body text only.

Viewing another user’s (published) free/busy status

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Schedule+ 95 users can view each other’s published free/busy status.

Viewing another user’s (shared but not published) free/busy status

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server or mixed

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can view shared but not published free/busy status of other Outlook users.

Outlook users can also view the shared but not published free/busy times of Schedule+ 95 users if the necessary Schedule+ 95 files are installed on the Outlook user’s computer. In this case, Outlook actually opens Schedule+ 95 and uses the Schedule+ 95 Meeting Planner to display the Schedule+ user’s free/busy status.

b) None.

c) Schedule+ 95 users cannot see Outlook users’ shared but not published free/busy status.

Opening another user’s calendar

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server or mixed

a) Outlook users can open each other’s calendars.

Outlook users can open a Schedule+ 95 user’s calendar if Schedule+ 95 is installed on the Outlook user’s computer. In this case, Outlook opens Schedule+ 95 and displays the other user’s calendar in Schedule+ 95 instead of in Outlook.

Schedule+ 95 users cannot open Outlook users’ calendars.

b) None

Viewing another user’s free/busy details

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook can view the free/busy details of Schedule+ 95 or Outlook users in the Meeting Planner (right mouse click) if all users are on Exchange Server.

   Win 16 Schedule+ 7.0 users and Win 32 Schedule+ 95 users can view Outlook users’ free/busy details if the appropriate driver is installed.  (See the http://microsoft.com/outlook for information on the drivers.)

Delegate access (such as reading and writing into another user’s calendar)

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users, but they cannot be delegates for Schedule+ 95 users.

b) Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users, but only when the Outlook option to use Schedule+ 95 for scheduling is selected.

c) Schedule+ 95 users cannot be delegates for an Outlook user.

Directly booking a meeting into another user’s calendar

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook can book meetings into Schedule+ 95 conference rooms or resources directly.

b) Outlook can book meetings directly into Schedule+ 95 conference rooms or resources.

c) Schedule+ 95 users cannot write an appointment into an Outlook user’s calendar.

Outlook users cannot book into another Outlook user’s calendar directly, but they can duplicate the functionality by opening the user’s calendar.

Task delegation

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook users can delegate tasks to other users by sending task request messages.

   When Schedule+ 95 users receive a task request message from an Outlook user, the task information is displayed as body text only.

Contacts

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook Contacts can include e-mail addresses and can therefore be used to send messages.

   Schedule+ 95 contacts can include e-mail address information, but they cannot be used to address messages.

Import Schedule+ appointments, contacts, and tasks

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook imports Schedule+ 95 data.

Group Scheduling over the Internet

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook 98 Win32 allows users in organizations without Exchange Server, and home users, to publish and download free/busy information from Internet servers using the iCalendar Internet standard, and to send and receive meeting requests and responses formatted in the vCalendar Internet standard format. These features are not available in Outlook 97, Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0.

 

Outlook Interoperability with Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0

 

The following table summarizes interoperability differences users should know about when they upgrade to Outlook from Schedule+ 1.0.

 

This Outlook feature or capability

On these Microsoft workgroup servers

Interoperates this way between Outlook and Microsoft Schedule+ 1.0

Sending and receiving meeting requests or task requests

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Both users can exchange meeting requests freely. However, Schedule+ 1.0 does not recognize some Outlook advanced message features, such as attachments and recurring meetings.

   When an Outlook user sends a task request (delegating a task) to Schedule+ 1.0 users, the Schedule+ users see the contents of the task request as body text only.

Viewing another user’s (published) free/busy status

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook and Schedule+ 1.0 users can view each other’s published free/busy status.

Viewing another user’s (shared but not published) free/busy status

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server or mixed

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can view shared but not published free/busy status of other Outlook users.

Outlook users cannot view the shared but not published free/busy times of Schedule+ 1.0 users.

b) None.

c) Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot view Outlook users’ shared but not published free/busy status.

Opening another user’s calendar

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook users can open each other’s calendars.

   Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot open Outlook users’ calendars.

Viewing another user’s free/busy details

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook can view the free/busy details of Schedule+ 1.0 users (in the Outlook Meeting Planner.)

   Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot view Outlook users’ free/busy details.

Delegate access (such as reading and writing into another user’s calendar)

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users, but they cannot be delegates for Schedule+ 1.0 users.

b) Outlook users can be delegates for other Outlook users when the Outlook option for using Schedule+ 95 for scheduling is selected.

c) Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot be delegates for an Outlook user.

Directly booking a meeting into another user’s calendar

a) Microsoft Exchange Server

b) Microsoft Mail Server

c) Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

a) None.

b) Outlook can book meetings into Schedule+ 1.0 conference rooms or resources directly.

c) Schedule+ 1.0 users cannot write an appointment into an Outlook user’s calendar.

Outlook users cannot book into another Outlook user’s calendar directly, but they can duplicate the functionality by opening the user’s calendar.

Task delegation

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook users can delegate tasks to other users by sending task request messages.

   When Schedule+ 1.0 users receive a task request message from an Outlook user, the task information is displayed as body text only.

Contacts

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook Contacts can include e-mail addresses and can therefore be used to send messages.

   Schedule+ 1.0 does not include a contacts feature.

Import Schedule+ appointments, contacts, and tasks

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook imports Schedule+ 1.0 data.

Group Scheduling over the Internet

Microsoft Exchange Server, Microsoft Mail Server, or mixed

   Outlook 98 Win32 allows users in organizations without Exchange Server, and home users, to publish and download free/busy information from Internet servers using the iCalendar Internet standard, and to send and receive meeting requests and responses formatted in the vCalendar Internet standard format. These features are not available in Outlook 97, Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0.

 

Appendix B: Terms Used in This White Paper

 

Most administrators may already be familiar with the terms in this appendix. However, it is a good idea to read through these definitions to be sure you understand them as they are intended in this paper.

 

Delegate

 

A user can designate other users to be their “delegates.” As a delegate, a user can manage the owner’s e-mail and schedule, as well as create, send, and reply to messages (including meeting and task requests) on the owner’s behalf. For example, managers may give their assistants or teams access to their schedules so the assistant or team members can create messages, appointments, tasks, or other items for them.

 

Direct booking

 

With appropriate permission, Schedule+ users can add an appointment directly into a Schedule+ resource account’s calendar, instead of sending a meeting request. For example, some organizations allow users to book times for conference rooms directly. However, by sending meeting requests, it is possible to monitor and maintain a record of who requested the resource.

To book a resource directly, the following conditions must exist:

       A Schedule+ resource account must be set up and the people who need to book the resource’s time directly must be given at least Create permission for its calendar.

       The This is a resource check box in the resource’s account must be selected.

       Users must invite the resource as a “resource” attendee.

 

Edit another user's calendar

 

An Outlook user can give other users Editor permission to specific items (such as appointments, tasks, and contacts) in his or her calendar. With Editor permission, users can add, delete, and modify items in the owner’s calendar. Editor permission does not make a user a delegate. Editor permission enables a user to modify the Outlook items specified by the owner, whereas a delegate can also send and reply to meeting requests on the owner’s behalf, in addition to modifying, or editing, the owner’s specified items.

 

EFD

 

See Microsoft Exchange Forms Designer.

 

Free/busy details

 

Users who have been given at least Read permission to another user’s calendar can not only see when that user is free or busy, but they can also view—from within the Meeting Planner—the description (details) of the appointments or activities that user has scheduled.

 

Free/busy status

 

When users “publish” their free/busy status, other users can view the free/busy time blocks (but not necessarily their free/busy details) from within the Meeting Planner.

 

Message form

 

The form in which an application displays e-mail messages it receives. In this white paper, “message form” refers to any message form, such as a custom message form, that is not one of the application’s standard message (Send Note or Reply Note) forms. See Standard message form.

 

Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane

 

An add-on feature included on the Microsoft Exchange Server Technical Resource CD. The Preview Pane helps Microsoft Exchange Client users manage their messages. Microsoft Outlook supports many of the features provided by the Microsoft Exchange Client Preview Pane.

 

Microsoft Exchange Forms Designer (EFD)

 

The design environment for creating Microsoft Exchange forms.

 

Non-table view

 

A view that consists of more elements than simply rows and columns. For example, the Outlook Card view is a non-table view.

 

Office 97 Document Forms

 

Created with Outlook Forms, Office Document Forms are based on Microsoft Office document templates, such as Microsoft Word or Microsoft Excel templates. Only Outlook users can use Office Document Forms.

 

Opening another user's folder

 

With at least Read permission, users can view another user’s folder (such as his or her calendar) to display the descriptions of the user’s items in that folder. The folder owner specifies the type of items (such as appointments, tasks, or contacts) for which the other user will have Read permission.

 

Outlook Forms

 

Forms created using the Outlook forms design environment.

 

Permissions

 

A user can give other users access to his or her folders by granting those users specific permissions. Different permissions give users different levels of access to the owner’s folders. For example, a user can give one coworker permission to read only and another co-worker permission to create and modify items.

 

Published free/busy status

 

Users can choose to publish their free/busy status (time blocks) to other users, so the other users can view them from within their Meeting Planners. If a user does not publish his or her free/busy status, other users cannot view that user’s free/busy status from within their Meeting Planner.

To set the option to not publish their free/busy status to others, users click Options from the Tools menu, then Calendar, and then click Advanced. Then, in Publish x months of free/busy status, they enter 0 (zero).

 

Standard message form

 

In this white paper, “standard message form” refers to an application’s standard Send Note form or Reply Note form. See Message form.

Table view

 

A view that consists of rows and columns. For example, the Messages view of the Inbox is a table view.

 

Task delegation

 

Assigning a task to another user automatically, by sending the user a task request message. Outlook enables users to delegate tasks to other users by sending a task request (message) to the other users. Although Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 do not provide task delegation features, Schedule+ 95 and Schedule+ 1.0 users can receive task requests; however, the task information appears as text only in the message. See Task request.

 

Task request

 

The message sent by Outlook users to an Outlook, Schedule+ 95, or Schedule+ 1.0 user to delegate a task to the recipient. When an Outlook user receives a task request, the task information is presented in an easy-to-use format. When a Schedule+ 95 or Schedule+ 1.0 user receives a task request, however, the task information is displayed as text only in the message. See Task delegation.

 

Viewing (opening) another user's folder

 

See Opening another user’s folder.

 

Voting message

 

A “ballot” message Outlook users can send, receive, and track automatically. When Outlook users receive a voting message, the selections they can vote on appear as buttons in the Outlook message, and the responses are logged automatically in the sender’s Inbox. When Microsoft Exchange Client and Microsoft Mail 3.x users receive voting messages from Outlook users, they receive the text of the Subject line and body of the voting message. No voting buttons are displayed.

 

 

1997, 1998 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. This document is provided for informational purposes only.

The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.

This document is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, IN THIS DOCUMENT.

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